Stuff your grandma says

 In 1812 American editor Charles Miner wrote, “When I see a merchant over-polite to his customers, thinks I, that man has an axe to grind.” It means to have a hidden agenda. Axes, commonly heavy wooden blades attached at right angles to wooden handles, were essential to chopping wood — once the only way you could heat your house. Although we heat with a furnace, we still have my father’s axe in our garage, and I use it to cut down the firewood handily delivered and stacked every fall by a local service for a fee that would make my father keel over. Keel: to capsize, as in a boat. Sometimes Grandma’s stuff gets murkier and murkier. Murk: oh, never mind.

In 1812 American editor Charles Miner wrote, “When I see a merchant over-polite to his customers, thinks I, that man has an axe to grind.” It means to have a hidden agenda. Axes, commonly heavy wooden blades attached at right angles to wooden handles, were essential to chopping wood — once the only way you could heat your house. Although we heat with a furnace, we still have my father’s axe in our garage, and I use it to cut down the firewood handily delivered and stacked every fall by a local service for a fee that would make my father keel over. Keel: to capsize, as in a boat. Sometimes Grandma’s stuff gets murkier and murkier. Murk: oh, never mind.

 

 

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Going to hell in a handbasket

- means heading for disaster. It's presumed to refer to the baskets placed under guillotines to catch the results of an execution. Yuck.